Wayne State University

Advisor Handbook

Definition of Academic Advising

Academic advising is the intentional, informed, and collaborative process of assisting students to set, monitor, and achieve their educational goals.

Helping skills and techniques

The advising interview
Developmental advising: A description
Developmental advising: Advising tasks and developmental strategies
Developmental advising goals and process
Essentials in selecting college courses
Hints for effective advising
Referral skills
Dealing with a diverse student body
Appreciative advising article
Appreciative advising example (PDF)
Advisor starter kit-conversations starters (PDF)
Strengths-based advising article (PDF)

Advising topics

  • AA Record in STARS

    AA Records are created to indicate an exemption to general education requirements either because the student has a previous Bachelor degree or meets the criteria for the General Education Transfer Policy. These AA records are visible in Banner or under the "Gen Ed/Curr" tab in STARS.

  • Academic Average

    To figure your GPA, divide the total honor points by total credits. The 4 credit hours included in the "credit hours" column is for purposes of illustration only. Please use the actual credit hours earned for the course to compute your GPA.

    Grade Honor points
    per Credit Hour
    Credit Hours Honor Points
    A 4.0 X 4 = 16
    A- 3.67 X 4 = 14.68
    B+ 3.33 X 4 = 13.32
    B 3.0 X 4 = 12
    B- 2.67 X 4 = 10.68
    C+ 2.33 X 4 = 9.32
    C 2.0 X 4 = 8
    C- 1.67 X 4 = 6.68
    D+ 1.33 X 4 = 5.32
    D 1.0 X 4 = 4
    D- 0.67 X 4 = 2.68
    E 0 X 4 = 0
        + +
        Total Credits Total Honor Points

    For a repeated course, deduct the honor points associated with the earlier attempt and add the honor points from the current term, utilizing the correct number of total credits. If the credit hours for the course is different (e.g., SPB 1010 for 2cr. or 3cr.), deduct the credit hours associated with the previous attempt and add the credit hours from the current attempt.

  • Accelerated Graduate Enrollment (AGRADE) Program

    The College of Liberal Arts introduced the Accelerated Graduate Enrollment (AGRADE) program in the Fall 1989 to encourage academically superior students to continue their education at Wayne State as graduate students. Such students who are majoring in a department that participates may, upon admission to the AGRADE program begin to accumulate up to 15 semester hours of approved coursework that will fulfill undergraduate and graduate requirements simultaneously. Admission to the AGRADE program does not constitute admission to a graduate program; the student must apply for admission as a graduate student and be admitted, following which Student Records creates a graduate transcript showing the authorized courses, credit and grades.

    Each academic department in Liberal Arts & Sciences has the prerogative of deciding whether or not to participate in the AGRADE program. For further information, consult the current Undergraduate Bulletin or Graduate Bulletin.

  • Admission to the University

    University Admissions is responsible for admitting freshmen, transfer students, guest students, and post-baccalaureate and graduate students.

    Admission as a FTIAC is based on high school grade-point average, ACT or SAT score and supporting documentation on an indvidual basis.

    Admission as a transfer student without using one's high school record or test scores requires a minimum of 12 transferable semester hours with at least a 2.00 GPA. Admission directly to a professional program requires the student to have met all admision prerequisites and to complete the application requirements of the program.

    The following schools and colleges do not admit freshmen: Pharmacy & Health Sciences and Social Work.

    A student who does not enroll for classes in the term for which s/he has been admitted to the University must file a renewal application. 

  • Advanced Placement Program

    The Advanced Placement Program provides high school students the opportunity to complete college-level courses during secondary school.

    The rule prohibiting students from using courses with the same departmental code more than twice in satisfying general education group requirements also applies to AP credit.

    NOTE: If a student satisfies both areas of Natural Science by examination, the University's Natural Science Laboratory Requirement should be considered fulfilled.

    Score Reports may be requested after the testing dates and sent to WSU. The student should be directed to contact the College Board either by phone or mail at the following address:

    College Board Testing Services
    P.O. Box 6671
    Princeton, NJ 08541-7300
    (609) 771-7300

     

  • Appeals/Waivers of University or College Requirements

    Appeals for waivers of requiremants may be directed to the following individuals or offices:

    University Requirements

    General Education Petition - See website for instructions and electronic form.
     

    Appeals/waivers of college requirements:
    Liberal Arts and Science, 2155 Old Main, 577-5188
    Fine, Performing & Communcation Arts, 5104 Gullen Mall, 577-5342

  • Biology 1500 and 1510 Placement

    Placement  into BIO 1500 and BIO 1510 by exam.

    1. Students who have a composite score of 24 or higher on the ACT (most recent score) or a score of 1160 or higher on SAT Critical Reading + Mathematics (most recent) within the last 2 years can automatically go into BIO 1500 and BIO 1510. Students with older scores are required to take the Biology placement exam.
    2. Students with an ACT Composite of 23 or SAT of 1150 or below are placed into BIO 1050 (only the 3 credit lecture of 1050 is required - no lab).
    3. If a student with old or lower scores wishes to place into BIO 1500 and BIO 1510, they will need to take the Biology Placement Exam.
  • Business Administration

    The School of Business prohibits students from taking its courses at the 4000-level or higher without permission. Students should not anticipate getting permission if they are deficient in total hours, GPA or course prerequisites. Students who register for such courses without permission are likely to be withdrawn from them administratively.

    Completion of the minor in Business Administration as well as ACC 4630, FBE 4400, MGT 4520, and MGT 4600 enables a student who is admitted to the master of business administration (MBA) to begin taking the program's core requirements.

    Community college courses titled Principles of Management, Principles of Marketing, and other courses in which similar subject matter is taught at the 4000-level at Wayne State will not transfer, with two exceptions:

    1. If the student took the courses at Macomb Community College (MKT 101= MKT 4300; MKT 102 = MKT 5700; MKT 201 = MKT elective; MKT 202 = MKT 5490; MGT 101 = MGT 4510) and enters WSU in the Fall of 1994 or later.
    2. If the student took these courses or their equivalents at a community college other than Macomb and follows Fashion Merchandising at WSU, in which case transferred courses are listed with the prefix "G E."

    To graduate from the School of Business Administration, students must have earned at least 52 hours in "non-business" coursework. All courses with a subject area code of ACC, FBE, MGT, and MKT are considered to be "business" coursework as are Economics courses at or above the "3000" level. Computer Science courses below the "3000" level may be used as "non-business" electives but Physical Education and Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) credit may not be so used.

  • Business Minor

    The School of Business Administration offers a minor which is open to any undergraduate other than a Business Administration student who has a minimum overall honor point average of 2.50. Students must complete all course requirements, including prerequisite courses (MAT 1500, ECO 2010: Micro, 2020: Macro, and PSY 1010) with no grade lower than a "C." The minor consists of eight courses totalling 23 hours. Students who plan to graduate from  Liberal Arts & Sciences should note that this total exceeds by seven hours the maximum credit allowed in professional courses. (See Restrictions on Credit). Students may substitute ECO 4100 for ISM 3300, thereby exceeding the limit by only four hours, and be able to graduate at 124 hours rather than 127 hours. Students who complete some of the requirements for the minor at schools other than WSU are likely to have earned more professional course credit than they would have earned here. Because students who pursue this minor are not enrolled in Business, they must officially declare the minor in room 200, Prentis Building.

  • CLEP Equivalencies At WSU

    NOTE: Students may not receive General Education credit for both European and American History, or for both American Government and Comparative Politics. When completing Group Requirements, a subject area code may not be used more than twice.

  • Change of College

    A Change of College is a procedure by which an advisor instructs Central Records to code a student in a college other than that in which he or she is currently registered or was last registered.

    For a college change, the advisor submits an e-mail request to recordsmaintenance@wayne.edu specifying the student's name, PID, new college, curriculum, and effective term.

    Students in other schools or colleges who are on academic probation may transfer to either CFPCA or Liberal Arts &Science only if they are ineligible for exclusion based on university standards, meaning:

    1. They have been excluded or asked to withdraw from one of our other schools or colleges but do not have below a 2.0 cumulative GPA; or
    2. They have not registered for any term following the one in which they went on probation; or
    3. The current term for which they are registered is their first term of enrollment after going on probation; or
    4. The current term for which they are registered is their second term of enrollment after going on probation, in which case they may not register during Priority Registration and the final grades they present must raise their GPA to a 2.00 or higher.
  • Change of Curriculum

    A Change of Curriculum is to be used only when a student is changing programs within the same college. The request should be submitted to the Records Office via an e-mail request to recordsmaintenance@wayne.edu. Please include the student's name, PID, curricululm code and effective term.

  • Change of Grade

    For any of a variety of reasons, an instructor may change a student's final grade or mark. Whether the student requests the change or the instructor, the process is completed using an online system. The procedure is outlined here.

    The deadline for completing work to convert the mark of "I" to a grade is one calendar year from the time the "I" was submitted. An additional year may be granted upon written request from both the student and instructor. An instructor may set a deadline shorter than that of the university. 

  • Chemistry Courses

    Students who take more than one introductory Chemistry course, such as 1020, 1220 and 1410 will not receive degree credit for both. This rule also includes CHM 1050 and 1070. For example, a student who completed 1020 and then completed 1220/1230 receives full credit for 1020, but only 3 degree credits for 1220/1230. Credit is not deducted from the student's total on the transcript, so the excess credits need to be added to the number of credits required to graduate. In the example above, the student would need to complete 122 credits to graduate, rather than 120. Please refer to the chart for specific credits earned.

    Course Credits earned Course Credits earned
    CHM 1020 4 cr. CHM 1220/1230 3 crs. of 5
    CHM 1020 4 cr. CHM 1410 3 crs. of 6
    CHM 1020 4 cr. CHM 1050 3 crs. of 6
    CHM 1020 4 cr. CHM 1070 3 crs. of 4
     
  • Civilizations and Societies Requirement

    A course within the Civilizations and Socieities category is required for students earning degrees from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Approved courses may be found on the curriculum sheet for the collegem or listed on Degree Works. The Junior Year in Germany experience also meets this requirement. A course that appears as meeting a group requirement and is also listed for the CS requirement, cannot be used to satisfy both requirements.

    Transfer courses may be approved for this requirement if they adhere to the focus of the category on a case by case basis by an advisor.

    Guidelines for CS courses include a focus on folklore, religious studies, culturally oriented courses offered in departments of languages and literature, or interdisciplinary studies in the humanities. Designed to stress the inter-relatedness of the humanities and culture, this course will emphasize the position and importance of the arts, philosophy and literature in society.

    Note: For transitioning ISP students only: Any course completed with an (FC) designator prior to the change to a different CLAS department or program will satisfy the (CS) requirement.

    Transfer courses will be submitted to a 3-person panel in the UAC to determine if the submitted course meets the criteria and satisfies the CS requirement.

  • Co-Major

    Co-majors in the following areas are offered and must be officially declared in conjunction with a stand-alone major program. These co-majors do not require that general education requirements for the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences be fulfilled, only those required by the primary major program.

    • Latino and Latin American Studies; requires a minimum of 33 credit hours of approved course work
    • International Studies; requires a minimum of 32 credit hours of approved course work
    • Peace and Conflict Studies; requires a minimum of 32 credit hours of approved course work
    • University Honors; requires a minimum of 36 credit hours of Honors course work
  • Cognate Credit

    See Professional School Credits in LA&S/CFPCA. The University Advising Center may approve 8 credits of cognate (professional school) credit. The major department must approve any additional credits, for a total of 16 credits.

  • College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

    Caveats:

    • A CLEP exam may not be re-taken within a 6-month period
    • No credit is awarded for CLEP in a foreign language
    • Credit will not be awarded for CLEP scores on the basis of their appearance on the transcript of another institution

    CLEP transcripts may be requested from:
    CLEP Transcript Service
    P.O. Box 6600
    Princeton, NJ 08541-6600
    (609) 771-7865

  • Combined Degree

    Students may complete a "combined degree" when they wish to teach at the secondary level in a subject area such as foreign language or any other subject area considered a teachable major (ex. English, Chemistry). The student declares his/her major in the academic discipline, completes all general education requirements for the college that offers the major, and applies to the College of Education to complete the methods courses and student teaching. The student is granted the degree from the academic college, and is qualified for a teaching certificate by the College of Education.

  • Competency Requirements

    Competency Requirements are basic skills included in the University General Education Requirements. These requirements include Written Communication (including Basic Composition, Intermediate Composition,  and Writing Intensive Course in the Major), Mathematics Competency, Oral Communication, and Critical Thinking. These requirements should be fulfilled early in the student's undergraduate career.

    Students who plan to earn concurrent degrees or concurrent majors must fulfill the Writing Intensive requirement for both programs. 

  • Concurrent Degrees/Dual Degrees

    To earn concurrent degrees, a student must complete at least 150 semester hours, fulfill all university, college and departmental requirements, complete and submit two separate degree applications and must receive both degrees at the same time.

    Within either CFPCA or Liberal Arts &Science a student may earn two degrees by declaring both majors, meeting the requirements of the college and each major, and earning at least 150 semester hours.

    If one degree is to be from CFPCA and the other from Liberal Arts & Science the student must be reminded of the differences in General Education requirements between those colleges and the requirement to meet those of Liberal Arts & Sciences.

    To pursue two degrees in each of two different colleges listed above, the student should be coded in the college that offers the more specialized of the two programs.

    To pursue a degree in either Liberal Arts & Sciences or CFPCA, and a second degree in a professional school or college, the student must first be accepted by and enrolled in the professional school, then must see an academic advisor in the major department. The student must go to the department for a plan of work and signature for the second major before submitting the request to Records. This informs Central Records that the student plans to declare a major in a college in which he or she is not coded, that the major department approves, and that the student is to remain coded in the professional school. 

  • Concurrent Majors/Double Majors/Dual Majors

    A student may earn one degree with what is commonly referred to as a "double major" by completing requirements of the college and each department, including the Writing Intensive courses for each major, and earning a minimum of 120 hours. If both majors are within the same college (FPCA or Liberal Arts & Science), the Declaration of Major procedure is the same as it is for one major. If two academic colleges are involved, indicate the college with the most comprehensive general education requirements as the primary major on the first line of the email sent to the Records office and the secondary major on a second line. If a professional program is involved, and allows for dual majors/degrees, admission to the professional program is required first and will constitute the primary major. 

    Please note that regardless of whether the student earns one degree with concurrent majors or earns two degrees, he or she must meet all college and departmental requirements. 

  • Conversion of Quarter Hours to Semester Hours

    Conversion of quarter hours to semester hours may be accomplished by dividing the number of quarter hours by 1.5 and, if necessary, rounding up to the next integer.

  • Course Repetition

    The policy on repeating courses allows a student to raise his or her GPA by repeating a course and thereby having the original Points and Hours Attempted subtracted from the Honor Point Fraction. The following stipulations apply:

    1. The original grade must be a form of A,B,C,D, E or F.
    2. A repeat override must be set in Banner using SFASRPO to permit the student to register for the repeated course.
    3. If the same course no longer exists, the student should contact department to request approval to use a substitute course.
    4. The course may be repeated only at Wayne State.
    5. If the same course still exists, it must be that course which the student repeats. If the course number has changed, an email should be sent to Records. If the same course no longer exists, the department must authorize a substitute course.
    6. The original grade and hours attempted are subtracted from the student's Honor Point Fraction.
    7. After a student has graduated, repeating a course that was taken as an undergraduate will not result in the value of the original grade being deducted from the Honor Point Fraction.

    Students who earn a low grade in a course at Wayne State should be warned against repeating a similar course elsewhere: if the student's original grade was a "D," the equivalent course taken elsewhere will not transfer to WSU since he or she already has credit for it; if the original grade was an "E" or "F"," the equivalent course taken elsewhere will transfer to WSU but the original grade will remain on the WSU transcript and in GPA calculation.

  • Credit by Exam

    Upon the recommendation of the Department Chairperson and with the written approval of the appropriate College or School office, a student may earn credit in a course in which he/she has not been regularly enrolled in this University, but which is offered by a Department, by passing a special examination. Credit by a special examination is restricted as follows:
    1. Not more than sixteen credits may be earned in any one subject.
    2. Not more than thirty-two credits by examination (CLEP, AP, and Special Examination) may be included in the minimum credits required for graduation.
    3. Credit may be recorded with grade to indicate the level of performance in the examination but will not be considered in computing grade point average.
    4. Credit will not be considered residence credit.
    5. To be eligible to earn Credit by Special Examination, a student must have been regularly admitted or have attended with guest status, have enrolled for one semester and have completed at least one course.
    Students who intend to transfer to other schools are cautioned that Credit by Special Examination at one institution is infrequently accepted for transfer credit by another institution.

  • Deficiency Points

    Deficiency points, an arithmetic measure of the level of work a student must do to achieve a certain Grade Point Average, are most often used in reference to students who are on Academic Probation but the idea and similar calculations are applicable to any situation in which a student is trying to attain a GPA higher than the one he or she has. Neither the Undergraduate Bulletin nor any other publication of the university contains a reference to deficiency points so if the information here is not clear, ask a senior advisor to explain the details.

    For students on academic probation, there are two methods of calculating deficiency points, defined as the number of semester hours of "B" work required to raise a Grade Point Average to 2.00. One method, suitable primarily for students who have not enrolled for more than a total of three or four terms, is to assign one of the following values to the grade for each course the student has completed: A = +2; B = +1; C = 0; D = -1; E or F = -2. Assigning the appropriate value to each grade for a student who is on probation will, upon adding the numbers, result in a negative number which will represent the number of hours of "B" work (or half that number of hours of "A" work) that the student must earn in order to raise the GPA to 2.00.

    The other method of calculating deficiency points involves using the Honor Point Fraction and is described under Grade Point Average.

    We must emphasize here and elsewhere that the calculation of deficiency points does not take into account the benefit that accrues by eliminating a prior grade as a result of repeating a course taken originally at Wayne State. In most cases, students are well-advised to repeat courses in which they have earned a low grade as long as they do so with a clear understanding of why they did not do well the first time.

  • Degree Audit

    A Degree Audit occurs whenever an advisor reviews a student's progress in meeting requirements for whatever program he or she is following. Utilizing the Degree Works application on Academica will assist students to become familiar with the application and simplify the process.

    It is imperative that the advisor approach the audit with the understanding that the fact that credit hours earned at WSU or elsewhere appear on the WSU transcript under the heading of various subjects does not inevitably mean that those credits apply toward the minimum hours required to graduate. Second, the audit must be based only on what the student has actually completed and is not to include any work in progress nor should it acknowledge any verbal reports from the student concerning such matters as CLEP scores that are in the mail, "Incompletes" that are being made up, or coursework taken recently at another school.

  • Dietetics

    The Dietetics major cannot be declared in the same way as other majors in the College of Liberal Arts & Science. It is treated in the same way as an application to a professional program with a limited number of students admitted each year. The major is declared internally by the department when the student is admitted to the program.

  • Distinction, Graduation with

    The university recognizes the top 20% of undergraduate students within each college graduating each term. To be eligible for consideration, students must have accumulated 60 or more credit hours in residence at WSU. The following distribution applies:

    Top 5% Next 5% Next 10%
    Summa Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude
     
  • Dual Degrees

    See also Concurrent Degrees. To earn dual or concurrent degrees, a student must complete at least 150 semester hours, fulfill all university, college and departmental requirements, complete and submit two separate degree applications (the student pays for only one) and must receive both degrees at the same time.

    Within either CFPCA or Liberal Arts & Sciences, a student may earn two degrees by declaring both majors, meeting the requirements of the college and each major, and earning at least 150 semester hours. If one degree is to be from CFPCA and the other from Liberal Arts & Sciences, the student must be reminded of the differences in General Education requirements between that college and the others and of the need to meet those of the latter group.

    To pursue two degrees in each of two different colleges listed above, the student should be coded in the college that offers the more specialized of the two programs, the guideline being whether or not the program has a departmental curriculum code. If each program has a departmental curriculum code, the student should decide which degree is the primary one.

    To pursue a degree in either CFPCA or Liberal Arts & Sciences and a second degree in a professional school or college, the student must first be accepted by and enroll in the professional school, then see an academic advisor for a Change of College on which the advisor must note clearly "CONCURRENT DEGREES: DO NOT CHANGE CODING," a message that informs Central Records that the student plans to declare a major in a college in which he or she is not coded, that the UAC approves for the dean's office, and that the student is to remain coded in the professional school.

  • Dual Majors

    See also Concurrent Major and Co-Major. A student may earn one degree with what is commonly referred to as a "double major" by completing requirements of the college and each department, including the Writing Intensive courses for each major, and earning a minimum of 120 hours. Complete the "College and Program Approval" form checking the box for "Dual Majors".

    Please note that regardless of whether the student earns one degree with concurrent majors or earns two degrees, he or she must meet all college and departmental requirements. The basic requirements of Liberal Arts & Sciences exceed those of CFPCA and, for some requirements, are defined differently. If a student decides to graduate without one of the declared majors or if he/she would like to change one of the majors to a minor, the student must re-declare his/her major.

  • Early Academic Assessment

    The university policy on early academic assessment requires that courses taught at the 1000- and 2000-level include a means of assessing student progress, normally before the end of the fourth week of classes but no later than the seventh week. This assessment should provide students with feedback regarding their performance. Instructors are requested to provide the University Advising Center with a list of names of students who have not achieved a satisfactory level (C or better) on this early assessment for the purpose of follow-up and referral to appropriate campus resources.

  • Educational Adjustments Committee

    The Educational Adjustments Committee for the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences is the body to which students may direct an appeal concerning a requirement which is specific to this colleges. The student initiates the process by picking up an instruction form in the Office of Student Services for Liberal Arts & Sciences: 2155 Old Main: 7-5188.

    The process for students in the College of Fine, Performing & Communication Arts begins by the student contacting his or her major department.

    It should be understood that while the student has the privilege of petitioning for some modification or waiver of a requirement, the advisor should caution students that appeals are not automatic and not to submit a baseless appeal that wastes his or her time as well as that of the major department and of the EAC.

    A student does not appeal to the EAC concerning a requirement that is specific to his or her academic major: such a petition must be directed to the department.

    Similarly, an appeal concerning a requirement that is shared between the college and the university should be directed in writing to the Office of the Provost, 4117 F/AB. The appropriate form from the student's major department or college should accompany the student's letter; if the student has not declared a major nor been admitted to a professional program, the memorandum should be written by an advisor in the UAC.

  • Emerging Scholars Program

    The Emerging Scholars Program is a program designed to give more students the chance to successfully pursue careers in the Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering.

    The academic component of ESP focuses on the foundational courses of Pre-Calculus and Calculus. The program centers around the nationally accepted concept of the "Calculus Workshop" developed by Professor Uri Treisman at the University of California at Berkley.

    The Pre-Calculus and Calculus Workshops are 4-hour per week problem-solving supplements to the regular lecture course. It is somewhat analogous to a lab for a science course. Students in ESP register for both a specifically designated section of Math 1800, 2010 or 2020 and the workshop. In the workshop, students work in groups on very challenging problems not normally presented in a "regular" course. Two main principles govern the workshop:

    1. The Workshops constitute a type of honors program. Workshop problems are carefully constructed to require both a very high level of mathematical thinking as well as a mastery of mathematics that is the basis for advanced study. Students will be constantly challenged and encouraged to deal with the subject matter in depth and at an advanced level--to go beyond the boundaries of the standard course.
    2. Workshops encourage collaborative learning and group interaction. Students learn through their own efforts, not through lectures.

    For further information, call the Mathematics department at 577-2596.

  • Engineering Technology

    Courses taken in Engineering Technology may not be used for a degree in Liberal Arts & Sciences or Fine, Performing and Communication Arts. Such credit is not considered "professional" credit and simply does not count toward the degree in the aforementioned colleges.

  • English Composition Grade Requirement

    Effective Fall term 2008, all students will be required to demonstrate the Basic Composition (BC) and Intermediate Composition (IC) competencies by satisfactory completion of designated courses or equivalent transfer courses with a "C" or better, or by earning advanced placement credit. Basic and/or Intermediate Composition courses successfully completed at Wayne State University prior to Fall Term, 2008 are exempt from this new grade requirement.

    If a BC or IC course was completed at another institution before Fall 2008, and if the grade was below C, and if credit for the BC or IC course was transferred to Wayne State, the BC or IC requirement is ONLY COMPLETE if the student was regularly admitted to Wayne State before Fall 2011.

    NOTE: Transfer policy does not cancel out the requirement that BC and IC must be completed with a "C" or better grade.

  • English Placement Criteria
    1. Any student who has taken the ACT within the past two years prior to enrollment and has a score of 21 or higher on the English portion  or a 480 SAT Writing Score is placed into ENG 1020. Students with scores older than 3 years prior to enrollment in the course must take the English Qualifying Exam.
    2. Students placed into ENG 1010 by ACT  or SAT score who are not satisfied with their placement, as well as all students who do not have ACT scores less than 2 years old, may take the English Qualifying Exam.
  • Enrollment Policy, Review of

    Students should be directed to the Office of the Registrar for appeals for exceptions to university enrollment policies, such as medical withdrawals and tuition cancelation.

  • Exclusion Appeal

    Students who have been excluded from the colleges of Liberal Arts & Sciences based on their academic performance may appeal the minimum one-calendar year Exclusion based upon documented extenuating circumstances.

    The completed exclusion appeal packet, along with a current copy of the WSU transcript, must be submitted to the Reinstatement Committee no later than the 15th of the month to be reviewed in that month. The committee reviews appeals only once each month. Appeal deadlines are: November 15 for winter term, March 15 for spring/summer term, and July 15 for fall term.

    The student may not file an exclusion appeal while s/he is completing current coursework. However, the student may wish to use current coursework, once completed, as the basis for an appeal. Please consult with the chair of the Reinstatment Committee on how current coursework can serve as the basis for an exclusion appeal.

    If the student's appeal is granted, the student will meet with an assigned advisor and complete a Reinstatement Contract, which both will sign. The contract will stipulate the minimum grades and other academic conditions for the term of registration. The student may not register again until s/he can produce grades from the term that are at least "C" and meet contract conditions.

    The student may file only one appeal. If the exclusion appeal is denied, the student may still apply for Reinstatement following the normal one-calendar year exclusion period.

  • External Credit

    Students earn credit outside WSU from any of the following sources: the Advanced Placement Program, the College-Level Examination Program, colleges and universities in the United States, colleges and universities in other countries, and the International Baccalaureate Examination Program. Advisors should note that no credit is granted for life experience, portfolio, or for military or business training, a policy that holds regardless of any recommendation by the American Council on Education.

    • External Credit: Advanced Placement Program

      Credit is awarded for Advanced Placement Examinations according to the WSU Advanced Placement Policies, a document produced by Transfer Credit Evaluation and updated annually. For most AP exams, a minimum score of "3" is necessary to receive credit. Scores of "4" or "5" will usually result in additional credit. The document also indicates the course or courses at WSU to which that credit is equivalent and, when appropriate, the General Education Requirement that is fulfilled by that credit.

      Because different schools vary in their policies concerning Advanced Placement credit, such credit does not transfer directly from one institution to another. Transfer students who took AP examinations in high school should have an official score report sent to WSU by writing to:

      Advanced Placement Program
      P.O. Box 6671
      Princeton, NJ 08541-6671
      and enclosing the following:
      1. Full name at the time of testing
      2. Birthdate
      3. Social Security Number
      4. Institution to which scores are to be sent. The School Code # for WSU is 1898.
      5. Institution where examination was taken
      6. Subject and year of each examination
      7. A check or money order for $8, the price of reporting one or more exams results to one institution; rush requests are $13 and may be placed by calling 1-609-771-7300. Scores for exams taken prior to 1988 must be ordered in writing.
      Because this information may change, students should call first.
    • External Credit: College-Level-Examination Program

      Credit is awarded for College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests according to the Wayne State University College-Level Examination Program Policies, a document produced by Transfer Credit Evaluation and updated annually. It includes minimum scores required to receive credit, the amount of credit awarded, the WSU course to which that credit corresponds, and the General Education Requirement fulfilled by that credit.

      Because different schools vary in their policies concerning CLEP credit, such credit does not transfer from one institution to another. Transfer students who have taken CLEP examinations while attending another institution must have an official score report sent to WSU by calling 1-609-951-1026 or by writing to the address below. The School Code # for Wayne State University is 1898.

      College-Level Examination Program Transcript Service P.O. Box 6600 Princeton, NJ 08541-6600 and enclosing the following:
      1. Full name at the time of testing.
      2. Birthdate
      3. Social Security Number
      4. Date, month and year the test was taken
      5. Name of the test and test center
      6. Name of the institution to which scores are to be sent
      7. A check or money order for $10 per test date.

      The Testing & Evaluation Office (698 SCB: 313 / 577-3400) administers CLEP examinations.

       

    • External Credit: Domestic Schools

      The acceptance or denial of credit earned at other colleges and universities in the United States is guided by the Transfer Student Statute which established the first universitywide policy concerning a student's educational history. Implementation of the Statute and several provisions in it departed significantly from past practice and required advisors to look at transcripts in a much different light.

      The statute, passed by Board of Governors in July of 1983, applies to transfer students who entered Wayne State in the winter term of 1984 or later. Such students are granted credit for transferable courses which they passed. Students who entered WSU prior to Winter 1984 had to have earned a "C" or better for the course to transfer.

      Another point concerning the transfer of "D" work is that for many programs an advisor must have a copy of the other school's transcript to inform a student correctly as to which requirements he or she has fulfilled and which remain to be met. The practice of not listing on the WSU transcript another school's grades along with the transferred credit is common and long-standing. For professional programs that require a minimum grade of "C" in pre-professional courses, the advisor must refer to the other school's transcript.

      The posting of all transferable credit occasionally leads to some misunderstanding. Under the policies and procedures of the statute, all transferable credit is to be posted to the student's WSU transcript, not just the credit that counts nor merely the "best" credit for a given program. It is relatively unusual that a student who transfers more than 90 semester hours to WSU does not understand that he or she must do a certain minimum amount of work (e.g. at least 30 hours for the Residence Requirement) to earn a degree here. It requires more effort, however, to explain to a transfer student from a community college that of the 77 hours that have been "accepted" from a two-year school or schools, only 64 are going to count toward the minimum number of hours required to graduate and that he or she will need to accumulate, in this example, 120 hours plus the excess beyond 64, or 133 hours as a minimum in order graduate. In short, the notion of credit being accepted but not counting is significantly different for students as well as for advisors who were at Wayne State under the former system.

      Credit is awarded for the number of semester hours earned at the other institution regardless of the credit hours associated with the equivalent course at Wayne State. One exception involves pre-calculus: the Department of Mathematics stipulates that not more than five semester hours for the equivalent of our MAT 180 should be transferred.

      Although grades do not transfer and an Grade Point Average earned at another institution will not affect an GPA at Wayne State, grades earned elsewhere will be used to determine a student's admissibility to a professional school or college at Wayne State.

      If a student repeats at Wayne State the equivalent of a course already transferred from another school, credit for the transferred course must be deducted from the student's total hours. Currently there is no technology that automatically identifies such credit. The advisor must be alert for such repetition and refer the matter to Transfer Credit Evaluation unit who will deduct the original credit (WSU course credit always prevails over credit from other sources); otherwise, the student, assuming if there is a problem that someone will take care of it, will begin to count on that credit for graduation. A good rule of thumb for students and advisors is to assume that there has never been an error that has not been caught by a graduation clerk.

      Finally, the statute authorized the transfer "of up to 12 semester hours of credit earned in technical, vocational and applied (TVA) courses ... if such courses are determined to be cognate or related to a student's intended program." Procedurally, the student's major department must recommend to the TCEU that such credit be accepted.

      Perhaps the most important operating principle resulting from the statute is that credit is transferred if the course is transferable. One result of this policy is that a student's total hours may include credit that does not apply but the same situation exists for course work taken at WSU. In short, because credit is neither added nor deleted on the WSU transcript based on the program the student is following, an advisor must not assume that the total hours on the transcript all count toward graduation.

    • External Credit: Foreign Schools

      Enrollment in undergraduate programs across the university includes many students who have transferred here from colleges and universities outside the United States. Students enter Wayne State from all over the world and from educational systems that differ significantly from each other and from that in this country.

      Students should be referred to the Transfer Credit Evaluation unit for questions regarding transfer credits from foreign schools.

    • External Credit: International Baccalaureate

      Credit is awarded for the International Baccalaureate examinations in accordance with an established Wayne State policy. Very few schools in the metropolitan Detroit area currently participate in this program.

    • External Credit: Military Service and Trainig

      Based on a memorandum dated April 28, 1989 from Sanford N. Cohen, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, students who were fully admitted and matriculated at Wayne State beginning the fall semester of 1989 are ineligible to receive credit for military service or military training. However, "transfer credit may be granted for comparable military science courses completed satisfactorily at another accredited college or institution." This ruling derives from the Transfer Student Statute of 1983 which prohibits "the awarding of credit for training received in non-collegiate settings," a prohibition that applies also to police academy training programs.

      Students who were fully admitted and matriculated prior to the fall of 1989 were eligible to receive four semester hours (6 quarter hours) of credit under the label "Military Service" if they had served a minimum of six consecutive months of active duty in any branch of the Regular or Reserve Armed Services and had received an honorable discharge. Students received this credit by presenting their DD 214 Discharge Papers to the Transfer Credit Evaluation Unit or to its predecessor. This credit exempted a student from fulfilling the Public Acts of Michigan Statute No. 205, 1931, also known as the Government Requirement.

  • FERPA, Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act

    FERPA protects the privacy of student educational records. Under FERPA, parents cannot inspect their student's records (e.g. grades, financial aid, records, etc.) Parents who wish to access their student's record must have their student sign a written consent form authorizing their release. Read more detailed information.

  • Fine, Performing and Communication Arts

    The College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts includes the departments of Art & Art History, Dance, Music, Communication and Theatre.

    The College of Fine, Performing & Communication Arts general education college requirements are identical to those of the university with the exception that the Foreign Culture requirement of the university must be fulfilled by completion of the first two levels or testing beyond the second level of foreign language + the intermediate level of the language or a foreign culture course for any major resulting in a Bachelor of Arts degree.

    The Design and Merchandising curriculum of Art and Art History includes two programs: Apparel Design and Fashion Merchandising, programs which result in either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree. The latter degree does not require foreign language, but all students pursuing a BS must earn at least 24 semester hours in Natural Sciences. The BA degree requires completion of the Foreign Language Requirement requirement stipulated below, as well as the Natural Science requirement that pertains to all other Bachelor of Arts degrees.

  • Foreign Culture

    An approved course related to foreign culture may be elected instead of completing a foreign language at the intermediate level for some programs offered by WSU. See "Foreign Language" for particulars regarding the degrees which require a foreign language rather than a foreign culture course.

  • Foreign Language Requirement

    Completion of a foreign language through the third semester  is a requirement for any Bachelor of Arts in LAS, with one exception--Bachelor of Public Affairs.The only degrees and majors in Fine, Performing & Communication Arts that DO NOT require a foreign language are:

    • Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Major in Art
    • Bachelor of Fine Arts with a Major in Theatre
    • Bachelor of Music (except Vocal Performance majors)
    • Bachelor of Science with a Major in Dance
    • Bachelor of Science with a Major in Design and Merchandising

    For a student pursuing a Bachelors of Arts degree in College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts, the Foreign Language Requirement can be satisfied in one of the following ways:

    1. Successfully complete or place out of the third course in a foreign language sequence

    OR

    2. Successfully complete or place out of the second course in a foreign language sequence and take one additional course in Foreign Culture, selected from the Foreign Culture General Education listing.

    There is no Foreign Language Requirement for students in CFPCA who are pursuing a BA as a second degree, when the first undergraduate degree was earned at an accredited four-year institution.

    Students completing a degree in Public Affairs may use the following courses to meet both the CS and FC requirements:

    ARM 3410; FRE 2710, 2720; GER 2710, 2720, 3410; GRK 3710; ITA 2710, 2720; NE 2000; POL 2710, 3410; RUS 2710, 3410; SLA 3410; UKR 3410.

    Students who wish to continue the study of a language that they began in high school should regard their previous experience according to the following formula in attempting to determine what level they should begin with at Wayne State: one and one-half years of study in high school are approximately equal to one semester in college. That guideline becomes less reliable, however, with the passage of time. A placement examination in French, German, Italian, or Spanish is available and students who place beyond the third semester are considered to have met the language requirement and Foreign Culture requirement.

    Students who were born in, and who completed their secondary education in, a country in which English is neither an official language nor a language of instruction are considered to have fulfilled the Foreign Language requirement for those programs that require a foreign language as well as the Foreign Culture requirement of the university. No credit hours are attached to this consideration. Further, a student whose native language is other than English may not receive credit toward graduation for either coursework or Credit by Special Examination in that language at the elementary and intermediate levels.

    Students whose native language is other than English but who graduated from an English-language high school may arrange through the University Advising Center to be tested by a faculty member at another institution when the language is one that is not taught at Wayne State.

    Courses may not be taken on a P/N basis for any portion fo the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirement.  This means that 1010 and 1020 courses must be taken for a GPA bearing grade. The College considers 1010 and 1020 language courses as part of the group requirement and for all group requirements, both University and College P/N grading is not permitted.

  • Foreign Language Testing

    Students in the following colleges must demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor's degree: College of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts; College of Liberal Arts & Sciences.

    Students can demonstrate proficiency either by coursework--language study 1010, 1020 and 2010-or examination.

    Students who have studied a language other than English in high school or college may take a departmental proficiency test to determine placement.

    Native speakers of a language other than English that is taught at Wayne may satisfy the university's Foreign Language requirement through a departmental proficiency test. Earning credit by examination is not permitted for any foreign language.

    Native speakers of a language not taught at Wayne may seek qualified outside examiners. Students need to obtain a "Foreign Language Proficiency or Verification" form and guidelines from the University Advising Center, 1600 David Adamany Undergraduate Library. Students may not be tested by outside examiners for languages taught at WSU. Qualified examiners are limited to foreign language programs and departments at the University level.

  • Grade Point Average

    A student's Honor Point or Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the number of Honor Points he or she has accumulated by the number of semester hours attempted. These two numbers and their relationship are referred to as the Honor Point Fraction. Honor Points are derived by multiplying the credit for the course by the value of the grade (A = 4.0, B = 3.0, C = 2.0, D = 1.0, E = 0.0). To figure your GPA, divide the total honor points by total credits. The 4 credit hours included in the "credit hours" column is for purposes of illustration only, please use the actual credit hours earned for the course to compute your GPA.

    For example:

    Grade Honor points
    per Credit Hour
    Credit Hours Honor Points
    A 4.0 X 4 = 16
    A- 3.67 X 4 = 14.68
    B+ 3.33 X 4 = 13.32
    B 3.0 X 4 = 12
    B- 2.67 X 4 = 10.68
    C+ 2.33 X 4 = 9.32
    C 2.0 X 4 = 8
    C- 1.67 X 4 = 6.68
    D+ 1.33 X 4 = 5.32
    D 1.0 X 4 = 4
    D- 0.67 X 4 = 2.68
    E 0 X 4 = 0
        + +
        Total Credits Total Honor Points

     

    So a student who has earned a "B" in English 1020, an "A" in Art History 111, an "E" in Mathematics 1800, a "C" in Psychology 1010 and an "S" in UGE 1000 would have the following GPA:

    Course Credit Grade Honor Pts./ Hrs. Att. = GPA
    English 1020 4 B 12 4
    Art History 1110 3 A 12 3
    Mathematics 1800 (4) E 0 4
    Psychology 1010 4 C 8 4
    UGE 1000 1 S NA NA
    TOTAL 12   32 15 = 2.13

     

    Please note in this example that the student has attempted to complete 16 semester hours toward a degree; that for the purposes of an GPA, he or she has attempted 15 hours; and that the student has earned 12 hours toward graduation. Courses taken on a Passed/Not passed basis do not affect one's GPA.

    To calculate the number of semester hours of "B" work a student needs to reach a 2.00 GPA, multiply total Hours Attempted by two and subtract total Honor Points. The resulting figure is the number of hours of "B" work that the student needs to earn to raise his or her HPA to 2.00.

    To calculate the number of hours of "B" work a student needs to raise his or her GPA to 2.50 (the minimum average required to be considered for admission to several professional programs), multiply total Hours Attempted by 2.5, subtract total Honor Points, and multiply the result by two.

    To calculate the number of hours of "A" work required to raise an GPA to 3.00, multiply total Hours Attempted by three and subtract total Points.

    The calculations above do not take into account the effect on a student's GPA if he or she repeats a course first taken at Wayne State in which the original grade was an A, B, C, D, or E. For further information, see Course Repetition and Deficiency Points.

  • Grades and Marks

    The distinction between a grade and a mark is based primarily on whether or not a student completes the work for the class. A student receives a grade of "A," "B," "C," "D,", "F," "P," "N," "S," or "U" if he or she completes all (or most) of the assigned work for a course. A grade is an indication of the quality of work submitted.

    A mark is an administrative symbol usually indicating that a student has done something other than complete all of the work required for a course. Marks in the WSU system include an "I" (Incomplete, which will revert to "F" after one year), "R" (Repeated Course), "WP" (Withdrawal Passing),  "WF" (Withdrawal Failing), "WN" (Withdrawal Never Attended), "Y" (Deferred), and "Z" (Audit).

    For credits earned by taking a special examination offered by a department, a mark of AX, BX, CX, etc will be given depending upon the level of performance on the examination.  These marks are not considered in computing grade point average.

    The university deadline for an instructor to submit a Change of Grade or mark is one year from the point at which the original grade or mark was issued. Instructors may set a more restrictive deadline.

  • Grading Policy
    1. Students who request withdrawal from classes will be assigned one of the three following grades:

      WP--Withdrawal Passing
      WF--Withdrawal Failing
      WN--Withdrawal Never Attended

      Students who do not complete coursework and do not request a course withdrawal prior the withdrawal deadline receive a failing grade.

    2. Incompletes revert to "F" after one year. Work must be completed within one calendar year. There will be no exceptions.
  • Graduation with Distinction

    The university recognizes the top 20% of undergraduate students within each college graduating each term. To be eligible for consideration, students must have accumulated 60 or more credit hours in residence atWSU.

    The following distribution applies:

    Top 5%: Summa Cum Laude

    Next 5%: Magna Cum Laude

    Next 10%: Cum Laude

  • Group Requirements

    University General Education Requirements, Group Requirements for graduation from Liberal Arts & Sciences consist of:

    1. Natural Science one course in Physical Science as defined by Liberal Arts, & Sciences one course in Life Science as defined by Liberal Arts & Sciences, and a third course which can be either Astronomy 2010, Geology 1010, NFS 2030 or 2210, or an approved science course in a department not used for the Physical or Life Science requirement; one of the three courses must have a laboratory; courses that transfer from another instituiton must be equivalent to an approved WSU course, represent the study of a single science, or reflect a WSU department code with an appropriate general education designator;
    2. Historical Studies (one course);
    3. American Society and Institutions (one course);
    4. Basic Social Sciences (two courses);
    5. Visual & Performing Arts (one course);
    6. Philosophy & Letters (one course);
    7. Cultural Studies (one course);
    8. Foreign Culture, completion of one foreign language through the third semester for any major in Liberal Arts & Sciences (except a Bachelor of Public Affairs for which an approved course in Foreign Culture will suffice; for recommended courses, see Cultural Studies).

    Under General Education Requirements, students may not use a given Subject Area Code to fulfill more than two Group Requirements.  Exceptions to the  "no more than 2" rule are Honors (HON) and Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies (GSW) courses. Students transferring from ISP are exempt from the "no more than 2" rule.

    Group Requirements must be taken for a letter grade. Pass/no pass option may not be elected for Group Requirements.

    Students who transfer courses which have been earned on a quarter system may satisfy a specific requirement with a course that transfers as less than 3 credit hours. For example, a 4 credit course on the quarter system would count as 2.66 credit hours on the semester system and a 3 credit course would count as 2.0 credit hours. In both cases, the qualifying course would count for general education.

    A modification to the American Society & Institutions requirement was permitted by the Provost's Office in 1987 by allowing the two-course sequence in American history taken at either Henry Ford Community College (HIS 151 and 152), Macomb Community College (HIS 230 and 231), or Wayne County Community College (HIS 249 and 250) to fulfill the AI requirement. 

  • Guest Application

    Wayne State students who wish to attend another institution for one term may be required by that school to apply as a Guest Student. Wayne State students, even those who are returning temporarily to a school from which they previously transferred, should check with the school concerning enrollment prerequisites and procedures.

    The "Michigan Uniform Undergraduate Guest Application" is available in the UAC. Although certification concerning current enrollment and status is limited to the factual information listed on the form and does not guarantee that whatever course a student takes will transfer and will be appropriate, the only sensible approach is to encourage students to list specific courses that they are considering taking in order to minimize the possibility of error. Students who propose to take upper-division courses elsewhere with the expectation that they will apply toward the major should be advised to consult with their major department after we sign their application.

    Advisors in the UAC sign Guest Applications for students in CFPCA and Liberal Arts & Science. Students coded in other colleges at WSU must discuss their plans with appropriate staff in their colleges.

    Students attending WSU as Guest Students presumably know why they are here and what they can take that will serve their goals at their home school. Questions concerning the transferability and applicability of courses taken at WSU must be answered by someone at the student's home institution and not by someone in University Advising or Transfer Credit. Further, guests at WSU are eligible to attend here under that status for only one semester.

    Guest students are not eligible for financial aid.

  • Health, Withdrawal for Reasons of

    Students who need to withdraw from courses for health reasons should be directed to the Office of the Registrar to complete an Exception to Enrollment Policy. If the exception is granted the Office of the Registrar will drop all courses for which the student is registered and note "Complete Withdrawal" on the student's transcript for the term.

  • Holds

    Holds and statuses are methods used by the university to enforce its requirements by suspending the privilege of registering. Most of these involve either money or academic standards.

    The University Advising Center is involved in the holds and statuses listed below for students registered in Liberal Arts & Sciences.

    1. Probation Status -- This status is placed when a student's cumulative Grade Point Average falls below 2.00. It remains in effect until the student's GPA returns to a 2.00 or higher. An advisor may (and usually does) release an Academic Probation status after consulting with the student about solutions to whatever problems have contributed to the substandard work. The UAC will release this hold for either Priority or Open Registration but not once classes begin.
    2. Pre-Exclusion Status -- This status is placed when a student is enrolled in his/her third term on academic probation. It may be removed only by a designated group of advisors in the UAC after consulting with the student and determining that the student could return to good academic standing if given an additional term of enrollment. A contract is signed for the upcoming term, which usually limits the number of credit hours a student can carry and requires completion of courses with no grade less than a "C". Additional stipulations are often included. Because this status will be released only if the student fulfills the conditions of the contract, it is not released until grades are available for the contract term or student achieves 2.0 gpa in the current term.
    3. Exclusion Status -- This status is placed when a student is excluded for academic reasons. It is removed if the exclusion is rescinded due to improved grades or when an application for reinstatement is approved. Probation
    4. Readmission Status -- This hold is placed when an excluded student is allowed to register under contract for one additional term. The contract usually limits the number of credit hours a student can carry and requires completion of courses with no grade less than a "C" as well as a reduction in deficiency points. Additional stipulations are often included. Because this status will be released only if the student fulfills the conditions of the contract, it is not released until grades are available for the contract term.
    5. Returning Student status -- This hold is placed when a student has not registered for three consecutive terms, prompting a student to see an advisor. The purpose of this hold is to encourage students to review their major and general education requirements, check on any outstanding issues, and confirm their program.
  • Honor Point Average

    A student's Honor Point or Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the number of Honor Points he or she has accumulated by the number of semester hours attempted. These two numbers and their relationship are referred to as the Honor Point Fraction. Honor Points are derived by multiplying the credit for the course by the value of the grade (A = 4.0, B = 3.0, C = 2.0, D = 1.0, E = 0.0). To figure your GPA, divide the total honor points by total credits. The 4-credit hours included in the "credit hours" column is for purposes of illustration only. Please use the actual credit hours earned for the course to compute your GPA.

    For example:

    Grade Honor points
    per Credit Hour
    Credit Hours Honor Points
    A 4.0 X 4 = 16
    A- 3.67 X 4 = 14.68
    B+ 3.33 X 4 = 13.32
    B 3.0 X 4 = 12
    B- 2.67 X 4 = 10.68
    C+ 2.33 X 4 = 9.32
    C 2.0 X 4 = 8
    C- 1.67 X 4 = 6.68
    D+ 1.33 X 4 = 5.32
    D 1.0 X 4 = 4
    D- 0.67 X 4 = 2.68
    E 0 X 4 = 0
        + +
        Total Credits Total Honor Points

     

    So a student who has earned a "B" in English 102, an "A" in Art History 111, an "E" in Mathematics 180, a "C" in Psychology 101 and an "S" in UGE 100 would have the following GPA:

    Course Credit Grade Honor Pts./ Hrs. Att. = GPA
    English 102 4 B 12 4
    Art History 111 3 A 12 3
    Mathematics 180 (4) E 0 4
    Psychology 101 4 C 8 4
    UGE 100 1 S NA NA
    TOTAL 12   32 15 = 2.13

    Please note in this example that the student has attempted to complete 16 semester hours toward a degree; that for the purposes of an GPA, he or she has attempted 15 hours; and that the student has earned 12 hours toward graduation. Courses taken on a Passed/Not passed basis do not affect one's GPA.

    To calculate the number of semester hours of "B" work a student needs to reach a 2.00 GPA, multiply total Hours Attempted by two and subtract total Honor Points. The resulting figure is the number of hours of "B" work that the student needs to earn to raise his or her HPA to 2.00.

    To calculate the number of hours of "B" work a student needs to raise his or her GPA to 2.50 (the minimum average required to be considered for admission to several professional programs), multiply total Hours Attempted by 2.5, subtract total Honor Points, and multiply the result by two.

    To calculate the number of hours of "A" work required to raise an GPA to 3.00, multiply total Hours Attempted by three and subtract total Points.

    The calculations above do not take into account the effect on a student's GPA if he or she repeats a course first taken at Wayne State in which the original grade was an A, B, C, D or E. For further information, see Course Repetition and Deficiency Points.

  • Honors Program

    Wayne State offers a University Honors Program as well as as a Departmental Honors Program for many majors in Fine, Performing & Communication Arts and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Eligibility to take honors courses requires that FTIACs have a 3.50 GPA from high school, or a 26 ACT or 1100 SAT. Transfer students must have a 3.3 GPA. Continuing students with a 3.3 GPA or better after at least 24 credit hours of coursework are also eligible. A student must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.3 to remain in the Honor program. Colleges/departments may establish a higher GPA for retention in their particular programs.

    To graduate in the Departmental Honors Program, students must take at least 12 semester hours of honors courses including a senior honors thesis or project and a three-credit Honors Seminar (HON 4200-4280). Some departments require additional departmental honors courses. A student's overall GPA at graduation must be at least 3.3; some departments require a higher average.

    To graduate in the University Honors Program, a student must complete at least 36 semester hours in honors coursework including the Honors Seminar. Students earning a degree in a professional program can graduate with University Honors.

    Information about the honors programs is available in 2100 David Adamany Undergraduate Library, or at http://honors.wayne.edu/.

  • Humanities Substitutions

    Course substitutions for repeats of the HUM courses below are as follows:

    HUM 1010 = MUH 1340
    HUM 1020 = MUH 1350
    HUM 1030 = MUH 1370

    Advisors will identify and notify the Records Office, who will manually perform the repeat process.

  • Incomplete (I) mark

    Effective Fall Term 2006, " Incompletes" revert to "F" after one year. Work must be completed within one calendar year. There will be no extensions.

  • Interdisciplinary Studies Credits

    For a degree in Liberal Arts & Science, the limit on credit for Interdisciplinary Studies has been eliminated beginning S/S 2009 term. Further, IS courses will apply toward Group requirements without the "No more than 2 in the same department"  restriction.  For students obligated to meet General Education requirements, IS courses will continue to meet Competency Requirements for a degree in CFPCA or Liberal Arts & Science.

  • International Students and Scholars, Office of

    416 Welcome Center, 42 W. Warren 577-3422

    The Office of International Students and Scholars assists international students in adjusting to WSU and the country. All immigration, naturalization, health insurance and related governmental agency issues should be directed to this office. As a condition of enrollment, international students are required to purchase health insurance through WSU unless waiver qualifications are met.

  • Junior Year in Germany/Junior Year in Munich

    See Study Abroad. The Junior Year in Germany program is sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts& Sciences, Department of German & Slavic Studies. It is open to students of any major at Wayne State University, as well as students from accredited colleges and universities nationwide. Students earn WSU credit toward their degree while spending a year or a semester in Germany enrolled at the University of Munich. Students who have completed two years of college German or the equivalent, have Junior standing, and have an overall GPA of 3.0 or better are eligible to apply. Scholarships are available for WSU students.

    Junior Year in Germany Courses will satisfy the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Civilizations and Societies Group Requirement and does not violate the "no 2 in 1 department" rule for group requirements.

  • Labor School

    A maximum of 10 semester hours of elective credit may be granted to students who have completed the Labor School Program, a two-year program offered by the Labor Studies Center with the intention of helping workers to develop their "leadership and communication skills and increase their understanding of the complex issues confronting workers and their unions in contemporary society." Authorization for this credit is granted by the Transfer Credit Evaluation Unit upon receipt of a letter of recommendation from the director of the Labor School. The student must first have earned a minimum of 60 semester hours and have earned at least a 2.00HPA.

  • Laboratory Requirement

    At least one required science class must be taken with a concurrent, corresponding laboratory to fulfill the Natural Science requirement for  General Education.

  • Language Requirement

    See Foreign Language. Students who elect or are required to meet the Foreign Culture (FC) requirement with a foreign language need to complete one language through the third semester (2010 or 2110 or equivalent).

    Exemptions: Students who have graduated from a secondary institution where the language of instruction was not English or who demonstrate proficiency in the ability to read, write and speak a language other than English may be exempted from the language requirement. Those who feel they have extenuating circumstances that prevent them from learning a foreign language may appeal to the Education Adjustment Committee (EAC) for their intended college.

  • Learning Disabilities, Referral

    Students with learning disabilities can be accommodated in the Student Disability Services office, 1600 David Adamany Library, 577-1851. This office is responsible for providing reasonable accommodations for students with physical and learning disabilties. Students are encouraged to consult with this office prior to university enrollment.

  • Limits on Credits in Specialized Areas

    Limitations on credits below apply only to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    Areas Maximum Degree Credit
    Dance (approved courses) 16
    Health 8
    Applied Music (see below) 16
    Physical Education Activity 4

    A total not exceeding four credit hours from the following list of courses may be counted toward a degree in Liberal Arts & Sciences unless a curriculum specifically requires more extensive elections.

    MUA 2800
    MUA 2810
    MUA 2820
    MUA 2830
    MUA 2840
    MUA 2850
    MUA 2870
    MUA 2880
    SPR 2670
    SPC 2240
  • Limits on Credits--Registration

    Schools and colleges have established maximum credit levels for which a student may register in a single term as indicated below:

    College/School Limitation on credit hours
    Liberal Arts & Science Student with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and written approval from the advisor and Dean may take more than 18 credits in a semester.
    Business Maximum of 18 credit hours without permission. 
    Education Maximum of 20 credits without permission. 
    Engineering No maximum. 
    Nursing No maximum. 
    Pharmacy & Health Sciences No maximum. 
    DCE Maximum of 12 credit hours without prior approval,
     
    Non-Matric Status 18 credit hour limit applies.
  • MACRAO

    Wayne State University has the following provisos to the MACRAO Agreement:

    - Students will be required to satisfy the University's mathematics General Education requirement, which can be accomplished by completion of a college-level math course with a minimum grade of 2.0/C, or appropriate scores on standardized tests (CLEP, Advanced Placement, ACT Math test, or Math Qualifying Exam.) College-level math is a course considered College Algebra or higher.

    - Students must also satisfy all College requirements for their specific programs.

    - Agreement effective for transfers entering Wayne State University in the fall term 2013 or after.

  • Math 1110 + 1120

    Math 1110 + 1120 were created to prepare students to teach mathematics in elementary school. As of October 6, 2011 MAT 1110 and 1120 DO carry degree credit in LS. It was determined in winter 2011 that the courses would meet the Math Competency (MC) requirement. 

  • Math 1800 after Math 1500

    Students who complete Math 1800 after already having received credit for Math 1500 or its equivalent may count only 2 of the 4 credit hours earned for Math 1800 towards the degree. Please make a notation to this effect on any degree audit completed for the student and adjust the credit hours required for graduation.

  • Mathematics Proficiency Requirement

    Effective Fall 2016, the Math Competency (MC) requirement of our General Education Program will be suspended for all undergraduates. 

    Students graduating at the end of the Fall 2016 term or later will not need a MC-designated course in order to graduate.  On the other hand, students graduating at the end of the current spring/summer 2016 term still need mathematics competency as a requirement for graduation.  For students who have already taken a course that fulfills the MC requirement and are not graduating until the end of the Fall 2016 term or later, their MC course will count as elective credit towards the 120 credit hours needed for graduation.  Students will be encouraged to contact their advisor if this curriculum change will affect their Fall course schedule or Plan of Work. 

  • Mathematics, Qualifying Rules

    Effective Winter 2016

    Students who wish to enroll in a Math course at WSU must first qualify.  The most recent rules as of winter 2106 are indicated below:

    1.  MAT 1000 and STA 1020 prerequisites are now good for 6 semesters (including Summer) starting with the semester directly after a student is successful in the prerequisite.  This means that if the student took MAT 0900 or MAT 0993 in Summer 2014 or later, they can take MAT 1000 or STA 1020 this summer.  So, for example, if a student took MAT 0900 in Summer 2014 and received a CNC or better, they have Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Summer 2015, Fall 2015, Winter 2016 and Summer 2016 to be successful in MAT 1000 or STA 1020.  This rule also applies for ACT and SAT scores, an ACT or SAT score of 18 or higher taken May 9, 2014 or later is good for summer classes (since Spring/Summer classes start on May 9).  Please do not use the Testing page on Stars where it shows "outdated" to determine if the score is valid for these courses as ir may not be accurate.

    2.  All other courses through MAT 2010 have the same 3 semester prerequisite rule as before.

    3.  Students who need to repeat a MAT course through MAT 2350 for the third or fourth time must complete a process to get into the course.  The process is explained below.  Please, encourage your students to start the process early so they are not delayed in their coursework.

    RSP/ESP courses, except MAT 1050 - The student must contact RSP/ESP to find out how to repeat the course.  It is highly recommended that students take it with RSP/ESP for a third attempt.  Success rates are higher in these sections due to the support system provided by the program.  This is especially true for RSP (MAT 0900 and 0993) students.

    Non-RSP/ESP courses through MAT 2010 - Students must take the Math Placement Exam the semester directly before the semester in which they want to take the class.  So, if a student wants to take the course for a third time in Fall 2016, they must take the exam during Summer 2016.  This is true even if they have taken the exam before.  Once they place into the course again, they meet with the Math department to do a contract and the override.

    Non-RSP courses from MAT 2020 - MAT 2350 - The student must take a Basics of Calculus Exam in the Math department to gain access to the course.  They would schedule the exam and take it in the Math Department.  If they pass then the Math department does the contract and paperwork.  Their major advisor must also provide an email of support for retaking the course.

    Students who earn a score of "3" on the Advanced Placement Exam, and receive credit for Math 2010 are encouraged by the Math Department to register for Math 2010 in order to progress in the Math sequence.  These students should be directed to see the Math Department.

    Transferring in the Math 1110 equivalent doesn't place a student into Math 1120.  The student must take the qualifying exam and place into Math 1800 to take the course.

    Transferring in the Math 1800 equivalent doesn't place a student into Math 2010.  The student must take the qualifying exam and place into Math 2010.

    Placement exam results are good for two terms. Overrides of the placement exam requirement may be obtained by any advisor in the Math department if a student's placement has lapsed by one term.  This is a one-time permission per student.  Students need to make an appointment to speak with a Math advisor for this override.

    Effective Winter 2010:

    All students, including transfer and guest students, who plan to take MAT 0995, 1000, 1050, 1110, 1120, 1500, 1800 or 2010 as their first mathematics course at Wayne State University (WSU) must place into the course according to the policies of the WSU Department of Mathematics.  Effective Winter Semester 2010, there are two approved methods for MAT course placement. 

    PLACEMENT USING AN AMERICAN COLLEGE TEST (ACT) MATH SCORE

    ACT Math score of 29 or higher Placement into MAT 2010
    ACT Math score of 26 or higher Placement into MAT 1110, 1120, 1500, 1800
    ACT Math score of 21 or higher Placement into MAT 0995, 1050
    ACT Math score of 18 or higher Placement into MAT 1000

    Restrictions:

    1. The ACT Math score may not be more than two years old from the date of intended enrollment in the course.
    2. Placement using an ACT Math score will only be valid for three semesters (including Spring/Summer term) from the date of your first semester of admission to WSU.
    3. If you have taken the ACT more than once, only the most recent ACT Math score will be considered.

    PLACEMENT BY EXAMINATION

    Any student who does not place into an MAT course using an ACT Math score as described above must take the WSU Mathematics Placement Examination to determine MAT course placement.  The examination consists of 55 questions.  All students are given questions 1-40 but only those students who wish to place in MAT 2010 receive questions 41-55.  The exam has three levels of placement.  Passing at the first level allows entry into MAT 0995, 1000, or 1050.  Passing at the second level allows entry into MAT 1110, 1120, 1500, or 1800.  Passing at the third level allows entry into MAT 2010.  Students whose score is below that required for placement at the first level qualify only for MAT 0993, Beginning Algebra.  If you place into a course below the level that you had expected, you may either take the lower level course or study independently and retake the examination during the next testing period.

    If you took the ACT it is possible that your ACT Mathematics score, in combination with your placement examination score, may qualify you for a WSU mathematics course for which your placement examination score alone would be insufficient.  If you designated WSU as a recipient of your ACT scores, your ACT Mathematics score will automatically be considered when your placement examination is graded.  To be considered, your ACT score must be no more than two years old from the date of your intended enrollment in the course.  If you have taken the ACT more than once, only the most recent ACT Math score will be considered.

     

    The Mathematics Placement Examination must be taken before classes begin for the semester in which you plan to take the course.  Placement is valid for a limited time only.  Scores will be honored only for three semesters:  the semester for which the examination was taken and the two semesters immediately following.  For the purposes of counting, there are three semesters:  Fall, Winter, and Spring/Summer. 

    Note: If there is a discrepancy between placement based on a valid ACT Math score and the results of the Mathematics Placement Examination, the higher placement will be used.

  • Minors

    With the exception of the minor in Business Administration, there is no formal application process to begin coursework in the minor. Students may officially declare a minor by obtaining a college and Program Approval form from the University Advising Center. The form must be endorsed by the departmental advisor and submitted to the College in which the minor is located. This procedure may be completed as part of the Declaration of Major procedure or after a student has declared a major/been accepted to a professional program. A minor may not be officially declared without a major or professional program. The notation indicating that a student has completed the requirements for a minor appears on the student's transcript but not on the diploma.

    Please note that only 16 of the 23 credits required for the Business minor may count toward the Liberal Arts & Sciences degree.

    Students who have completed the requirements for a minor indicate the department on the Degree Application. Students who are considering developing a minor should contact the department early in their undergraduate career.

  • Natural Science Requirement

    The science requirement for a bachelor of science degree with a major in Design and Merchandising (one of the two degrees available to a student concentrating in either Apparel Design or Fashion Merchandising) is 24 semester hours. The additional sciences may include subjects such as biology, psychology and chemistry, but may also include Statistics 1020, Mathematics 1500, 1800, and 2010, and Computer Science courses at the 1000 level or above.

    As of 2009, in a memo distributed by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean's office, transfer courses in the Natural Sciences may only fulfill the these requirements when they have a specific WSU departmental code, (BIO, GEL, CHM, etc) and the appropriate General Education designator. For example, BIO 1XXX and GEL 1XXX could fulfill the Natural Science requirements if they also have the general education designator; but XESX and XPSX could not fulfill the Natural Science for Liberal Arts and Sciences requirements EVEN IF they have been given a Unversity General Education designator.

    In psychology, not more than 33 hours in psychology courses will apply toward the 60 hours required in natural sciences and the remaining 27 hours of sciences are not specified. Student shoud be directed to the department for appropriate courses.

     

  • Non-Matriculated Status

    Non-matriculated status enables students to take any undergraduate course for which the prerequisite is met. Courses may be taken from the following colleges: Fine, Performing, and Communication Arts and Liberal Arts & Sciences.

    Courses, credits and grades will be posted to the university's transcript. However, these will be used toward fulfillment of a degree only after formal admissions is granted through the Department of Admissions, Welcome Center, 42 West Warren.

    The holder of non-matriculated status is ineligible for any type of loan, grant or scholarship that is administered by Wayne State University.

  • Overload, Credit Hour

    Credits in excess of the normal load of 18 credit hours per term registration must be approved by an advisor or the Dean of the college in which the student is enrolled. Students must have a cumulative gpa of 3.0 or higher to be approved for an overload.

  • Pass/No Pass Option

    The University has a program whereby undergraduate students may elect to take courses Passed/Not Passed in place of a letter grade. The following regulations apply:

    • The student may elect one Passed/Not Passed course per semseter with the consent of an advisor, but may not elect more than 6 courses in all.
    • After classes have begun, a student may not change from Passed/Not Passed to a letter grade or vice versa.
    • Courses taken P/N may be used to satisfy competency requirements, but may not be used to fulfill group or major requirements.
    • Credits for a P/N course may be used to fufill graduation requirements but will not count in the GPA. In the event that a student enrolls in more than six P/N courses, those beyond the permissible maximum will be designated on the permanent record as not applicable toward graduation.
    • Undergraduates in the School of Business may not take courses offered by the School of Business Administration on a Passed/Not Passed basis.

    Courses may not be taken on a P/N basis for any portion fo the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Foreign Language Requirement.  This means that 1010 and 1020 courses must be taken for a GPA bearing grade. The College considers 1010 and 1020 language courses as part of the group requirement and for all group requirements, both University and College P/N grading is not permitted.

  • Post Bachelor Status

    This admission status is granted to college/university graduates to take courses through the 6000- level for undergraduate credit only.

    This status may be used for those students who seek admission to the Graduate division, who wish to earn a post bachelor certificate, who need to raise their grade point average and/or fulfill specific undergraduate course requirements. Students who wish to change their status from post-bachelor to pursue a second bachelor degree may do so by completing the appropriate process:

    Students who earned the first bachelor degree at WSU must make the request to the Records Office to complete a curriculum change.
    Students who earned the first degree from another institution must go to the University Admissions Office to make the change from post bachelor status to undergraduate status.

    Post bachelor students may qualify for financial aid only under very specific conditions.

    Students who seek to repeat classes to improve their gpa will not be eligible for financial aid
    Post-bachelor status should not exceed a period of 12 consecutive months
    Students are required to provide a plan of work, signed by an advisor and specifying courses required for the intended program, to the financial aid office

  • Qualifying Examinations

    The purpose of a qualifying examination is to determine a student's preparation for a particular course, to direct him or her into the appropriate course, and thereby save time and money for both the student and the university. Qualifying examinations are required of students who plan to enroll in Chemistry 1220. Placement into Math courses may be determined either by ACT score or Placement exam.

    In the case of Chemistry 1220 and Math courses, students must have taken and passed the examination within two semesters prior to registering for the course, as those departments do enforce the placement policy.

    The results of the Mathematics Qualifying Examination are valid for two consecutive semesters, a time limit that applies also to passing the prerequisite course.

    Passing MAT 1500 will not qualify a student for MAT 1800.

    The Mathematics Qualifying Examination is not required for graduate students nor for postbaccalaureate students who are transferring a course equivalent to Math 1800 in which they earned a "C" or better.

    Qualifying examinations are administered by the Testing & Evaluation Office: 698 Student Center Building; 577-3400.

  • Quarter Hours Conversion

    Conversion of quarter hours to semester hours may be accomplished by dividing the number of quarter hours by 1.5 and, if necessary, rounding up to the next integer.

  • Rank

    Rank is determined by the number of degree credits which the student has satsfactorily completed. The classifications are:

    Freshmen 0 to 28.99 credits, inclusive
    Sophomore 29 to 55.99 credits, inclusive
    Junior 56 to 87.99 credits, inclusive
    Senior 88 credits or above

  • Register/ Add / Override Approval

    The "Add and Override Approval" form is provided by Registration & Scheduling Office for use by a student who seeks approval to take a course on a Passed/Not Passed basis, to audit a course, to take a course that requires prior consent, to register/add a course after the first week of classes, and to enroll in a closed section of a course. All approvals for these options are provided by the appropriate department.

  • Registration Overload

    Students who wish to take more than 18 credit hours in a single term must gain permission from his/her respective college.  For students enrolled in FPCA and CLAS this permission must be given by the UAC.

    Permission is granted based on the best judgement of the advisor.  This judgement should be based upon past performance as well as reason given for the request.  If the advisor thinks the request reasonable, he/she sends an e-mail message to REGREQUEST@LISTS.wayne.edu. Student must have a minimum 3.0 cum gpa.

    Include the student's name, PID, academic term, and exact number of credits requested.

    Let the student know that the request will take up to 24 hours.  You will be informed when the request has been processed.

  • Repeat Policy

    In repeating a course the following rules apply:

    1. The grade, grade points and credits for an earlier attempt will be eliminated from the student's grade point average computation.
    2. The grade, grade points and credits of only the latest repetition will be included in the student's grade point average computation.
    3. The original grade in the course repeated will remain on the student's record. Each attempt at retaking the course will be indicated by an "E" next to the grade excluded from the gpa record and and "I' next to the grade included in the gpa record.
    4. Repeat overides must be entered into Banner in order for a student to enroll in a course again.  The UAC is authorized to provide the repeat override for a third attempt for students enrolled in LS or FPCA. A repeat override for a fourth attempt must be given at the department level, and the fifth attempt must be given at the dean's level.  WP, WF, and WN count as attempts as well as actual grades.
    5. Some departments, such as Math and foreign language give all overrides for their own courses.  Major departments give overrides for upper-division courses.

    After a degree has been granted, no grade computed in that degree may be changed.

    Courses taken elsewhere which are similar to those for which a student has received a grade at WSU will not be transferable to Wayne State University and will not affect a student's WSU GPA.

    NOTE: If it appears that a repeated course has not been caught and the gpa recalculated by the Registrar's office, send an email to recordsmaintenance@wayne.edu notifying them of the course number, term first taken and repeated term, student name and ID.

  • Request for Exception to Enrollment Policy

    Students should be directed to the Office of the Registrar to file for exceptions to university enrollment policies, such as medical withrawals and tuition cancelation. The deadline to file for such an exception is not later than 60 calendar days following the end of the term in which the exception is requested.

  • Residency Requirement

    Each school and college at WSU has established residency requirements.  These are as follows:

    School/College Residency Credit Requirement
    Health Sciences Last 30 credit hours
    Business Last 32 credit hours
    Education Minimum 30 credit in College of Education
    During final year, no more than 10 transfer credits will be accepted
    Student must be in residence during the semester in which graduation requirements are complete
    For certificate programs, at least 15 credit hours must be completed at WSU
    Engineering All Engineering students must take at least 34 credits at Wayne State.  Engineering students who want to take any course outside of Wayne State after they have begun their WSU coursework must receive approval before registering for the course. 
    FPCA Last 30 credit hours
    Liberal Arts & Sciences Last 30 credit hours
    Nursing Last 30 credit hours
    Pharmacy Last 30 credit hours
    Social Work Minimum of 30 credit hours in School of Social Work

     

    NOTE: The definition of "the last 30 hours" means that the last 30 credit hours must consist exclusively of course work at Wayne State. Residency waivers must be submitted to the respective college prior to enrolling in a course that will violate the requirement.

  • Restrictions on Credit

    Students who plan to earn a degree in Fine, Performing & Communication Arts and Liberal Arts & Sciences are subject to following restrictions on credit:

    1. The Residence Requirement of these colleges means that the student's last 30 semester hours must be earned at Wayne State. Credit by exam does not disrupt residency if earned while enrolled in courses at WSU.
    2. Not more than 46 semester hours under the same Subject Area Code will apply toward the minimum of 120 hours required to graduate unless the program specifies a greater amount. All Bachelor of Arts degrees with the exception of Art History (for which the maximum is 48 hours) are subject to this limitation. For specialized programs such as the bachelor of music and the bachelor of fine arts, this limit does not apply.
    3. Not more than 30 semester hours of work in professional courses (e.g. Business Administration, Education, Engineering, etc.) will apply toward the minimum of 120 hours in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. There are no longer any credit restrictions for professional credits for CFPCA undergraduate programs, effective for both current and new students.
    4. Not more than four credit hours in Physical Education Activity/Life Fitness Activities (PEA/LFA) will count towards a degree in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. No more than 8 credit hours of PEA/LFA courses will apply towards a degree in the College of Fine, Performing & Communication Arts. It is important to disguish between activity credit and professional credit. In the latter category, such courses as "Officiating Techniques" and "Physiology of Exercise" have a Subject Area Code of "P E" when taken at Wayne State and come under the 30-hour limit described in # 3 above. Activity courses transferred to WSU usually have the prefix "P E" merely because that was the original Subject Area Code and it was programmed into the Student Records System.
    5. The restriction in Applied Music (MUA and/or MUP), which does not apply to students graduating from FPCA, limits a student to 16 credit hours. That total may not include more than four hours from the following: MUA 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 287, and 288.
    6. The restriction in Dance (DNC), which does not apply to students who plan to graduate from FPCA is 16 semester hours. Credits in Dance Education (DNE) are subject to the limitation under #3.
    7. The maximum amount of credit in Health courses (HE 2310, 2320, 2330, 3990) is eight hours. This restriction does not apply to students in FPCA.
    8. The University will apply up to 64 semester hours from accredited two-year schools. In practice, all transferable credit from either four-year or two-year schools is posted to to the Wayne State transcript although not more than 64 hours from a two-year school or schools will apply toward the minimum number of hours required to graduate.
    9. Credits in Engineering Technology (ET) do not count towards graduation in any program except Engineering Technology.
    10. No more than 16 credits of ROTC courses, and not more than 18 credits of military credit may apply towards a degree in Fine, Performing & Communication Arts and Liberal Arts & Sciences.
  • Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)

    Scores from the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) are used by University Admissions as the basis for admitting or rejecting an applicant. The SAT consists of two sections: Verbal and Mathematics. To be admitted solely on the basis of the SAT, a student must have minimum scores of 450 on the Verbal test and 400 on the Mathematics test.

    Students who need to have their SAT scores sent to Wayne State should call The College Board at 1-609-771-7600.

  • Second Degree, Requirements for

    The University's position with respect to students who wish to earn a second undergraduate degree, is that the University imposes no competency requirements on such students if they have received their first baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited school "or from a foreign institution that is normally recognized by Wayne State." Students must earn at least 30 credit hours at Wayne State. Specifics of the rules for each college can be found below.. 

    A student who is pursuing a second degree in a college that imposes time limits concerning undergraduate science requirements must be referred to that college for an answer to the question of whether he or she must repeat any coursework. Students should be referred to their respective programs for information regarding any time limits.

    It is permissable for a student to repeat a course which was completed within the first degree and have the course count towards the 30 credit hours required for the second degree.  This second attempt does not affect the previous grade earned in the first degree, as the gpa is fixed when the first degree is granted.

    Business Administration

    The only baccalaureate degree offered by Business Administration to students who already have one is in Accounting. All other students who want a degree must pursue a Master of Business Administration.

    Prospective Accounting majors must fulfill all Pre-Business Administration course requirements. They are not required to meet English or Math Proficiency.

    Education

    The College of Education does not offer a baccalaureate degree to students who have already earned one. Students who wish to earn a teaching certificate may do so as a post-bachelor's student in Education through the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. An exception is allowed if the first degree is from an unaccredited school.

    Engineering

    Students must meet all college and departmental course requirements and, in the process of doing so, must complete at least 30 semester hours beyond those that applied toward the first degree.

    Fine, Performing & Communication Arts

    Students must earn at least 30 hours at Wayne State and  fulfill all Major Requirements of the department from which they intend to graduate.  Competencies and General Education group requirements are waived in all but the BA degree, for which the foreign language requirement applies. Applicable coursework from a first degree may be used to fulfill this requirement.

    Liberal Arts and Sciences

    Students must earn at least 30 hours at Wayne State and must fulfill all Group Requirements of the college and Major Requirements of the department from which they intend to graduate.  In addition, if the transferable/applicable credit hours from the first degree total less than 90 credit hours, a student is required to complete whatever credit hours are needed to bring them to the 120 credits required for a degree at WSU. Effective fall 2012: the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences will consider all University group requirements met, requiring only those specific to their college which were not met by the first degree (Third Science, 2nd Social Science, Civilizations & Socieities and Foreign Language).

    Nursing

    Students who plan to earn a second degree may pursue the BSN either through the Collaborative Degree Program (also known as the "CD 2" program) or through the traditional undergraduate route. Students are required to fulfill the courses within the Nursing major (after completion of prerequisites for admission consideration).

    Pharmacy & Health Sciences

    Please contact the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at 313 577-1716  for the individual program requirements for second degree.
  • Senior Rule

    Senior Rule is a one-term opportunity provided to students who need only one or two courses to complete their undergraduate work and who wish to use their last term to take some graduate courses. He or she must be admissible to the graduate program and should apply well in advance of the beginning of that term. For that term only, the student's tuition is assessed at the Junior-Senior rate for all coursework, even for that which is designated as graduate credit. Courses carrying graduate credit are entered only on the graduate transcript.

    NOTE:

    • Students who have completed all requirements for a bachelor's degree are not eligible.
    • Students must register for at least one credit which is required for the undergraduate degree to be eligible.
    • Undergraduate and graduate courses combined may not exceed 16 credit hours for the final semester of the baccalaureate degree work .
    • Only graduate courses numbered 5000 and 6000 may be taken under this rule.
  • Study Abroad Programs

    Undergraduates at WSU may participate in any of several kinds of Study Abroad Programs.

  • TOEFL

    TOEFL policy changes are as follows:

    1. International students who complete the equivalent of our two freshman composition courses with a grade of C or better at a U.S. college or university are exempt from taking the TOEFL. Completing an associate degree also exempts them from the TOEFL.
    2. International and other students (regardless of their immigrant status) are not required to take the TOEFL if they graduate from a U.S. high school.
  • Three-Year International Degrees

    Policy guidelines published and effective beginning fall 1994.

    1. The international three-year degree is not the equivalent of a Wayne State University Baccalaureate.
    2. Three-year degree holders may be considered for undergraduate admission to the University. Prior coursework will be transferred to the University on a course-by-course basis. Such students will be exempted from the University-wide General Education requirements, but will need to complete the College-specific requirements.
  • Transfer Credit Evaluation

    Currently, the Transfer Credit Evaluation Office evaluates credit earned through Advanced Placement, the College-Level Examination Program, the International Baccalaureate program, and course credit from other colleges and universities in the United States for all undergraduates who enter WSU.

    Deductions of transfer credit for courses repeated at WSU should be communicated to the Transfer Credit Evaluation Office

  • Transfer Policy

    This General Education Transfer Policy, as detailed on the Office of Transfer Credit Evaluation website, applies to students who transfer to Wayne State University from a Michigan community college with an earned Associate of Arts (A.A.), an Associate of Science (A.S.), an Associate of Baccalaureate Studies (ABS), or an Associate of Liberal Arts (A.L.A.) and begin at WSU Fall 2005 or later. The Associate of Science in Nursing DOES NOT QUALIFY for the transfer policy. The transfer policy also includes students who transfer to Wayne State University from a Michigan community college with a MACRAO-stamped transcript but do not hold the associate degree. The schools and colleges at Wayne State have reviewed the policy and made determinations about how this policy will effect transfer students in their programs. The following list specifies for students and advisors how this policy will be interpreted for each program and where a program will demand specific general education course work because of major/professional requirements. The transfer policy satisfies only the University General Education requirements which are represented on the following lists. There may be additional courses and/or categories needed to satisfy the major and college requirements.

    NOTE: Transfer policy does not cancel out the requirement that BC and IC must be completed with a "C" or better grade. The transfer policy does not meet MC in any curriculum/program.

  • Transfer Student Statute

    Among the provisions of the full statute are the following:

    1. The university will accept all traditional academic credit from regionally accredited four-year schools.
    2. The university will accept up to 64 semester hours from accredited two-year schools. In practice, all transferable credit from either four-year or two-year schools is posted to to the Wayne State transcript although not more than 64 hours from a two-year school or schools will apply toward the minimum number of hours required to graduate.
    3. The university will accept transferable credit in which the student has earned a "C" or better.
    4. Concerning schools accredited by other agencies or having candidacy status with a regional association, the university will accept transferable coursework in which a grade of "A" or "B" has been recorded. The school must grant a degree, not merely a diploma, and must be accredited by an agency recognized by COPA. Finally, as with accredited schools, the course must either be equivalent or be of traditional academic nature.
    5. The university will transfer "up to 12 semester hours of credit earned in technical, vocational and applied (TVA) courses ... if such courses are determined to be cognate or related to a student's intended program."

    The statute contains several other provisions, a number of which merely codify previous practice. For an understanding of the impact of the statute, see External Credit: Domestic Schools. 

  • Withdrawal Policy

    Students who do not drop their courses by the end of the first week of classes or by the posted date for spring and summer sessions, are financially obligated to pay for the courses even if they have not attended any class sessions.

    Courses dropped prior to the fourth week or posted date during Spring and Summer sessions, do not appear on the student's academic records. After the fourth week or posted date, courses dropped are included on the student's academic record with a mark of "WF" or " WP". After the fourth week, students are required to have the instructor's signature to withdraw from a course.

  • Writing Intensive Requirement

    All students must demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively with specialized or professional audiences by successfully completing the writing requirements specified by the departments or professional schools in which they are seeking degrees. Students should consult with their major department or professional school for the approved course in the major.